Ohio Won’t Allow 17 Year Old Voters to Participate in Democratic Nomination Process

Husted
Thanks to Twitter user @nn99org for this image

The state of Ohio will be choosing its preferred Democratic nominee by way of the primary voting method on March 15. For many in their late teens, this is the first time they’ve ever cared about an election and certainly the first time they’ve had a chance to speak via their votes. But in Ohio, at a time when we want more youth involved in the process that will affect them for years to come, Ohio Secretary Of State Jon Husted has barred 17 year old voters from participating in the primary elections.

Kathleen Clyde Press
Photo courtesy of www.ohiohouse.gov

Ohio State Rep. Kathleen Clyde (D-Kent) issued a response to Sec. Jon Husted’s directive that excludes 17-year-olds from presidential primary voting. Ohio has permitted those who will be 18 years old before the November election to vote in the presidential primary since 1981.

“I was astonished to learn that 17-year-old Ohioans who will legally become adults before the November election are now being prohibited from having a say in the direction of their country at the presidential ballot box during the primary. Ohio’s pro-voter practice that welcomes young adults into the process has been on the books since 1981,” said Clyde.

After examining current law and past directives, Clyde says no precedent exists for Husted’s new voter exclusion. The new order that excludes 17-year-olds from voting for a presidential nominee is here on page 7-6. The non-partisan elections advocacy group Fair Vote also disagrees with Husted’s new decree.

“Secretary Husted’s latest underhanded, backroom attack on our most fundamental freedom should have us all concerned – about this and about his repeated claims he has made it easier to vote in Ohio – when in fact he continues to find ways to make it harder,” Clyde continued.

390px-Seal_of_Ohio.svg

3503.011 Qualifications of electors for primary elections.

At a primary election every qualified elector who is or will be on the day of the next general election eighteen or more years of age, and who is a member of or is affiliated with the political party whose primary election ballot he desires to vote, shall be entitled to vote such ballot at the primary election. Effective Date: 03-23-1981

It goes with out saying who will benefit the most during the Democratic nomination process from this appalling move of blatant voter suppression. Of course it is Hillary Clinton. You may recall that back in May of 2015, when Hillary Clinton looked to be inevitable, her legal counsel Marc Elias slapped Ohio with a  federal lawsuit aimed at curbing alleged voter suppression tactics.

But that was before they were taking Bernie Sanders or any other candidate seriously. They were already looking beyond the actual nomination process and looking instead towards the general election. So now that they will actually benefit from this, will they continue the fight? What about her supporters that know how much support Sanders has among the youth? Will they be true Democrats and stand up to this insanity if it means more votes for their opponent?

What I’d also like to know is where is DNC Chairperson Debbie Wasserman Schultz’s response to this? She should be attacking Husted hard on this issue with a team of lawyers and it needs to be done now! If she stands by silently, this will further cement the belief that she has been “secretly” helping Clinton in every way she can.

I think this move only goes to prove that the Republicans themselves know Clinton is a much easier foe than Sanders and are actually trying to help her. I mean think about it, they are fully expecting her to implode surrounding the FBI investigation, so if they can help her get the nomination, in their minds they have a much better chance of taking over the White House.

Please contribute to Bernie Sanders’ Official Campaign HERE

Please take a moment and “Like” The Bern Report on Facebook HERE

 

G.A. Casebeer

3 thoughts on “Ohio Won’t Allow 17 Year Old Voters to Participate in Democratic Nomination Process

  • March 7, 2016 at 4:43 pm
    Permalink

    Seeing as there is no precedent for this exclusion of otherwise eligible voters, I must call foul play on this move by the Ohio Secretary of State. This is an underhanded voter-suppression tactic meant to harm Sanders and deliver the nomination to Hillary Clinton. It is just another example of establishment corruption.

    Though I have to wonder whether we would be speaking out if it were Sanders who was helped by these voter suppression tactics?

  • March 8, 2016 at 12:51 pm
    Permalink

    This isn’t true, from what I can see. This post should be deleted, or it might dissuade 17-year-olds from voting.

    The Bern report states “The new order that excludes 17-year-olds from voting for a presidential nominee is here on page 7-6. ” This is the link you give: http://www.sos.state.oh.us/sos/upload/elections/EOResources/general/2015EOM.pdf

    The rule (in that link) itself states: “In presidential primary elections, a 17-year-old voter is not permitted to vote for presidential delegates, because delegates are elected and not nominated.”

    They CAN’T vote for DELEGATES, but the CAN vote for Bernie. It says “Ohio law allows a 17-year-old voter who will be 18 years of age on or before the date of the next general election to vote in the primary election solely on the nomination of candidates.6 This is because the 17-year-old voter will be eligible to vote for the nominees at the November general election.” Get the difference?

    Delegates are elected at the primary. The president nominee is not elected until Nov.

    Now, it’s totally possible that in response to being called out, the SOS changed the text back. But as of right now, the text shows that the CAN participate in the presidential nomination process. They CAN choose Bernie.

    • March 8, 2016 at 11:44 pm
      Permalink

      The text has always said they can vote. Apparently Bernie sees it the same way because his campaign is suing Husted.

Comments are closed.