Rudy Giuliani – A Chaotic, Addled Mess

By Gage Skidmore via Flickr.com

The Rudy Giuliani acting as President Trump’s lawyer and mouthpiece is not the same Rudy Giuliani we saw as mayor during 9/11. On September 11, 2001, Giuliani urged calm, and reminded New Yorkers not to take out their anger and grief on Muslim. Instead, he advised,

“We should act bravely. We should act in a tolerant way.”

The Rudy Giuliani we are currently seeing is actually the Rudy Giuliani most New Yorkers are used to. They have been familiar with this version for the last few decades. Giuliani is normally addled and chaotic. As a young man, Giuliani started as a Democrat. He supported John F. Kennedy and was opposed to the Vietnam War. In 1980, he became a Republican to work for the Reagan Administration. This was also when his sense of ethics changed dramatically. By 1989, he was running for mayor of New York City, promising to bring back the death penalty, and criticizing people for their associations with “black radicals.”

Promoting Racial Prejudice

Giuliani’s racial prejudice didn’t stop there. After losing his bid for Mayor, Giuliani spent the next four years implementing character assassinations and promoting racial prejudice. More recently, at the last Republican convention, he attempted to blame the country’s racial divisions on President Obama. (It is a standard Republican philosophy to blame President Obama for all the world’s problems. Racial hatred runs deep in the Republican Party.) Apparently forgetting 9/11 happened in 2001, during the Bush Administration, Giuliani attempted to blame President Obama for terrorist attacks. He said,

“Under those eight years, before Obama came along, we didn’t have any successful radical Islamic terrorist attack in the United States.”

Clearly, Giuliani’s grasp of reality is a little weak. Continuing to display his weak grasp, Giuliani blames the negative media view of him, which includes questions about his mental health, on Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump. Please note, he takes no responsibility for wild claims and strange behavior during television interviews. Much like Trump, his ego won’t let him accept responsibility for his own mistakes, let alone recognize he’s made any.

Keith D. Foote

Keith is also a freelance writer. He has written an alternative physics book titled the Ultra-Space Field Theory, and 2 sci-fi novels. Keith has been following politics, and political promises, for the last forty years. He gave up his car, preferring to bicycle and use public transport. Keith enjoys yoga, mini adventures, spirituality, and chocolate ice cream.